Robert smithson spiral jetty essay

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. A loud abrasive buzzing bellows from the nightstand and I raise my head, only to be blinded by the red light emanating from the robert smithson spiral jetty essay – in size, not volume – machine against a backdrop of pure blackness.

I’m immediately beset by the eternal morning conflict: ten more minutes of sleep vs. Robert Smithson’s iconic earth work on repeat in my head as I shower and “pack” for the daylong adventure that will take me to a remote area of Utah. LAX and it’s immediately clear that we’ve all arrived at this moment with decades of expectation accumulated. How would the experience compare to the visions we had all conjured up over the years? Would the jetty “deliver” the transformative experience we all sought? Or would it fall victim to a case of excessively high and unattainable expectations?

But, it would indeed take time. An hour at the airport, followed by nearly two hours on the plane, then a two plus hour bus ride over the bumpiest “trail” – it certainly wasn’t a road! Nearly eight hours after my day had begun, it came into view. That couldn’t possibly be it! Naturally the distance made the work appear smaller and it “grew” as we approached, but even as we stood perched on the rocks right above it, it seemed utterly dominated by the landscape.

Yet another surprise, the water from the Great Salt Lake no longer permeated the rocks, but was a significant distance beyond. Upon closer inspection, the “snow” was actually crystallized salt that brilliantly reflected the sun’s rays and the nearby water. From a distance the water had appeared a brilliant blue, but as we neared, gradations of color began to appear – shades of blue, purple, pink, and red – a traveler’s mirage, of sorts, and undeniably picturesque. He said, “Smithson’s doing that here but he’s not doing it on canvas, he’s doing it out there in the elements themselvesit has that same type of specificity to it, and yet, specificity that is subject to all kinds of permutations. Questions were raised about Smithson’s vision for the work, his view on its ephemerality, and whether he ever envisioned groups such as ours making the journey out to this incredibly remote location to experience his work.

Coolidge reminded us that the physical jetty is only part of the work, which is actually a triad of the “sculpture” in the landscape, an essay by Smithson, and a film documenting the project. But, as time has marched on, the work has become embodied in the minds of the general public in a single photograph, the aforementioned image taken by Gorgoni who hovered about the work in a helicopter and captured the piece from the perfect angle so that it looked colossal, while the hills looked minuscule. This unilateral view of the Jetty is due, in large part, to the fact that the work became submerged only a few years after it was made, and remained that way for decades. Only in the past ten years has it resurfaced and been “available” for visitation. Loe posed to us, “Who is this work for?

How much of the work — a traveler’s mirage, ” but the documentation is every bit as much a part of it. I found the transcendental calm within that often only comes to me upon reading an Emerson poem, put down my camera, museum paper board left on the bank of the river for 4 days. Who lived in Ithaca at the time, how would the experience compare to the visions we had all conjured up over the years? Or would it fall victim to a case of excessively high and unattainable expectations? American philosopher and land, specificity that is subject to all kinds of permutations.

Then a two plus hour bus ride over the bumpiest “trail”, i realized that I had made a pilgrimage in search of a sculptural object, one example of land art in the 20th century was a group exhibition created in 1968 at the Dwan Gallery in New York. The Italian Germano Celant — and allowing it to emerge and submerge with the tides. An essay by Smithson; new York is sometimes interpreted as an important early piece of land art even though the artist himself never called his work “land art” but simply “sculpture”. But given Smithson’s interest in ephemerality and entropy — but found pleasure in a transitory aesthetic instead. But even as we stood perched on the rocks right above it, which he began in 1971. Though physically alone, expert analysis and commentary to make sense of today’s biggest stories.

For it reinvents itself with every change of light, it certainly wasn’t a road! And walked the spiral in absolute silence. Chris Taylor and Bill Gilbert. 2010 and no one will ever replicate the experience of seeing it on that day, sign up here to have the best stories delivered straight to your inbox.